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Taos Municipal School Historic Collection

Sorted AscendingTitleDateArtistClassificationDimensions
A Road to Taosn.d.Joseph Fleck
Joseph Fleck Austria-Hungary (1892-1977)
Joseph Amadeus Fleck, born of German speaking parents in the village of Sziklos, Austria-Hungary on August 25, 1892, saw the American Southwest through Viennese eyes. He received his first education in the arts at the Kunstgewerbeschule or Institute of Applied Arts in Vienna, which he entered in 1908. There he studied lithography, etching, and ornamental engraving, receiving a diploma around 1911.
https://www.adobegallery.com/artist/Joseph_Fleck_Artist65917730
painting Overall: 25 x 30 in. (63.5 x 76.2 cm) Framed: 30 x 35 in. (76.2 x 88.9 cm)
Acoma1934Gene Kloss
Gene Kloss United Stateds (1903-1996)
Born in Oakland, California, in 1903, Kloss grew up in the Bay Area. She attended the University of California at Berkeley, where she studied with Perham Nahl, her instructor in life class and anatomy, who also gave a course in etching. Amazed by the first print she pulled from the press, Nahl predicted she would be an etcher. Kloss spent two additional years of study at the California School of Fine Arts in San Francisco and the College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland. In 1925 she married Phillips Kloss, a poet, and they made a honeymoon journey to New Mexico. It was a decisive point in Kloss’s career, initiating a lifelong fascination with the the landscape of the Southwest and the Native American peoples who inhabited the region.

National Museum of American Art (CD-ROM) (New York and Washington D.C.: MacMillan Digital in cooperation with the National Museum of American Art, 1996)

Gene Kloss and her husband, the poet Phillips Kloss, were notable figures in the Anglo community of Taos. The couple visited the area in the 1920s while on their honeymoon, and looking back on her first experience of a vibrant southwestern sunset, Gene wrote that ​“I was a New Mexican from then on.” The Klosses lived in Berkeley, California, in the cold months and returned every summer to Taos until they settled there permanently. Phillips crafted poems while Gene produced etchings and paintings of the Pueblo communities and spectacular landscapes. They chose homes that offered inspiring views from every window, and Gene wrote that ​“An artist must keep in close contact with nature and man’s fundamental reliance on nature in order to produce a significant body of work.” (Bradley, Gene Kloss: Graphic Works from Six Decades, 1984)

https://americanart.si.edu/artist/gene-kloss-2664
print Overall: 13 7/8 x 9 3/4 in. (35.2 x 24.8 cm) Framed: 23 1/8 x 18 3/8 in. (58.7 x 46.7 cm)
Ait No Crichen.d. painting Overall: 11 1/2 x 17 7/8 in. (29.2 x 45.4 cm) Framed: 15 1/4 x 21 3/4 in. (38.7 x 55.2 cm)
All Saint's Day Mass-Taos1934Gene Kloss
Gene Kloss United Stateds (1903-1996)
Born in Oakland, California, in 1903, Kloss grew up in the Bay Area. She attended the University of California at Berkeley, where she studied with Perham Nahl, her instructor in life class and anatomy, who also gave a course in etching. Amazed by the first print she pulled from the press, Nahl predicted she would be an etcher. Kloss spent two additional years of study at the California School of Fine Arts in San Francisco and the College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland. In 1925 she married Phillips Kloss, a poet, and they made a honeymoon journey to New Mexico. It was a decisive point in Kloss’s career, initiating a lifelong fascination with the the landscape of the Southwest and the Native American peoples who inhabited the region.

National Museum of American Art (CD-ROM) (New York and Washington D.C.: MacMillan Digital in cooperation with the National Museum of American Art, 1996)

Gene Kloss and her husband, the poet Phillips Kloss, were notable figures in the Anglo community of Taos. The couple visited the area in the 1920s while on their honeymoon, and looking back on her first experience of a vibrant southwestern sunset, Gene wrote that ​“I was a New Mexican from then on.” The Klosses lived in Berkeley, California, in the cold months and returned every summer to Taos until they settled there permanently. Phillips crafted poems while Gene produced etchings and paintings of the Pueblo communities and spectacular landscapes. They chose homes that offered inspiring views from every window, and Gene wrote that ​“An artist must keep in close contact with nature and man’s fundamental reliance on nature in order to produce a significant body of work.” (Bradley, Gene Kloss: Graphic Works from Six Decades, 1984)

https://americanart.si.edu/artist/gene-kloss-2664
print Overall: 10 3/8 x 14 1/4 in. (26.4 x 36.2 cm) Framed: 19 x 22 3/8 in. (48.3 x 56.8 cm)
Amolen.d.Joseph Henry Sharp
Joseph Henry Sharp (1859-1953)
painting Framed: 38 5/8 x 42 1/2 in. (98.1 x 108 cm)
Autumn in Talpan.d.John Ward Lockwood
John Ward Lockwood United States (1894-1963)
Painter, printmaker. Ward Lockwood recieved his artistic training at the University of Kansas, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, and in Paris. Further studies with Andrew Dasburg at Woodstock, New York, preceded his move to New Mexico in 1926. There he painted with fellow Kansan Kenneth M. Adams and with Dasburg and John Marin. During the 1930s, Lockwood participated in Works Progress Administration mural projects, responding to the taste for American Scene realism. A versatile artist in many media, Lockwood was a sought-after teacher; he held faculty positions at the University of Texas and the University of California at Berkeley. His southwestern landscapes are based on observed reality but demonstrate his enduring concern with formal problem solving, unified chromatic impact, and constrasting paint surfaces.


References
Ward Lockwood Papers.

Lockwood, J. Ward. ​“An Artist’s Roots.” Magazine of Art 33 (May 1940): 268–73.

Eldredge. Ward Lockwood 1894–1963.

Charles Eldredge, Julie Schimmel, and William H. Truettner Art in New Mexico, 1900–1945: Paths to Taos and Santa Fe (Washington, DC: National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1986)

https://americanart.si.edu/artist/ward-lockwood-2972
painting Overall: 16 x 25 in. (40.6 x 63.5 cm) Framed: 20 1/2 x 29 7/8 in. (52.1 x 75.9 cm)
Batroom Fantasyn.d.William Rowe
William Rowe (1910 - 1955)
painting Overall: 38 x 15 in. (96.5 x 38.1 cm) Framed: 40 3/4 x 38 in. (103.5 x 96.5 cm)
Blossoms and Trees1950Ada E. "Buff" Haney
Ada E. "Buff" Haney United States (1916-2003)
Ada E. "Buff" Haney was an artist. She studied with John O’Neil, Joe Taylor, Leonard Good and then with Hans Hoffman and Ernest Fiene, both in New York City. She also
studied with Jerry Farnworth in New Truro, Mass., and was chosen to assist in
his workshops in Sarasota, Fla. Early in her career, she exhibited in juried
shows at Pennsylvania State Teachers’ College, The Metropolitan Museum of Art,
The Santa Fe Art Museum, and by invitation at the La Fonda Gallery in Taos,
N.M. Her work was awarded Best of Show at the Midwestern Artist’s Competition
sponsored by Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, Mo., in 1942.


http://files.usgwarchives.net/ok/pontotoc/obits/06012003.txt
painting Overall: 19 1/2 x 23 1/2 in. (49.5 x 59.7 cm) Framed: 23 1/2 x 27 3/4 in. (59.7 x 70.5 cm)
Boulder Dam1940Helen Greene Blumenschein
Helen Greene Blumenschein United States (1909 - 1989)
Helen Blumenschein was the daughter of nationally famed parents, Ernest and Mary Blumenschein. In 1919 at the age of ten she was brought by her parents from New York to New Mexico, destined with them to pioneer the arts and crafts movement of Taos. Miss Blumenschein stressed that her development as an artist was devoid of parental influence other than the strong family creative atmosphere.

A lifetime deep interest in people, ecology and archaeology is evident in Miss Blumenschein’s dominant work subjects, which depict the mountainous southwest in which she lived most of her life. Her schooling included Taos Schools, The Packer Collegiate Institute in Brooklyn Heights, New York; two years study in Paris and printmaking work at the Art Student League in New York City from 1932-36.

She exhibited prints nationally and abroad from 1936-1945 and has had prints purchased by the Carnegie in 1951, New York CityPublic Library, and the New Jersey Library. Some of her selected one-person shows of portraits include Oklahoma City ArtCenter and the New Mexico Museum of Art.

From her arrival in Taos as a small child, driven from the railroad at Raton on the Colorado border by her father, who barely made it over the steep pass, Blumenschein’s work is vital in scope and history.

http://www.parsonsart.com/home/helen-g-blumenschein

print Framed: 17 3/4 x 13 in. (45.1 x 33 cm)
Bretagne Fischer Womenn.d.Etienne Ret
Etienne Ret (1900-1996)
painting Overall: 44 x 45 3/4 in. (111.8 x 116.2 cm) Framed: 45 1/2 x 47 1/2 in. (115.6 x 120.7 cm)