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Native American

TitleDateArtistSorted AscendingClassificationDimensions
When Harry met Sally2010Dwayne Wilcox
Dwayne Wilcox
Dwayne Wilcox is a contemporary Lakota artist using humor to comment on culture and cultural challenges. He grew up on the east side of the Pine Ridge Reservation. His family comes from the Eagle Nest District.

Dwayne attended the Crazy Horse School in Wanblee. In his own words “I never had any real art training other than being around a lot of talented traditional artists, most of all I always liked the humor of my friends and my family. I like to reflect on some of the stories told to me by friends and the political environment that may need to be adjusted to the native point of view, this is why I draw these images and show the viewers not from my culture, there is another point of view”.

When asked why he uses the lined paper and why use humor Dwayne responds with “Beads, cloth, paper… all of which had been introduced around the same time, and it was at a period when natives of the plains were losing their homeland to new conquerors and their refusal to give up the right to be free caused many to be imprisoned. Many of the earliest ledgers were done during incarceration. Like bead work, it has become a medium for a traditional style. In the Lakota tradition there is the Sacred Clown and in drawing can reflect that humor, I see that as part of the old values of traditional life ways.”
Dwayne currently lives in Rapid City, SD.

http://jwillis.net/artist-statement-dwayne-wilcox/
drawing sheet: 11 3/4 × 18 in. (29.8 × 45.7 cm)
Momma He’s Lazy2010Dwayne Wilcox
Dwayne Wilcox
Dwayne Wilcox is a contemporary Lakota artist using humor to comment on culture and cultural challenges. He grew up on the east side of the Pine Ridge Reservation. His family comes from the Eagle Nest District.

Dwayne attended the Crazy Horse School in Wanblee. In his own words “I never had any real art training other than being around a lot of talented traditional artists, most of all I always liked the humor of my friends and my family. I like to reflect on some of the stories told to me by friends and the political environment that may need to be adjusted to the native point of view, this is why I draw these images and show the viewers not from my culture, there is another point of view”.

When asked why he uses the lined paper and why use humor Dwayne responds with “Beads, cloth, paper… all of which had been introduced around the same time, and it was at a period when natives of the plains were losing their homeland to new conquerors and their refusal to give up the right to be free caused many to be imprisoned. Many of the earliest ledgers were done during incarceration. Like bead work, it has become a medium for a traditional style. In the Lakota tradition there is the Sacred Clown and in drawing can reflect that humor, I see that as part of the old values of traditional life ways.”
Dwayne currently lives in Rapid City, SD.

http://jwillis.net/artist-statement-dwayne-wilcox/
drawing sheet: 11 3/4 × 18 in. (29.8 × 45.7 cm)
Soup de Jour2010Dwayne Wilcox
Dwayne Wilcox
Dwayne Wilcox is a contemporary Lakota artist using humor to comment on culture and cultural challenges. He grew up on the east side of the Pine Ridge Reservation. His family comes from the Eagle Nest District.

Dwayne attended the Crazy Horse School in Wanblee. In his own words “I never had any real art training other than being around a lot of talented traditional artists, most of all I always liked the humor of my friends and my family. I like to reflect on some of the stories told to me by friends and the political environment that may need to be adjusted to the native point of view, this is why I draw these images and show the viewers not from my culture, there is another point of view”.

When asked why he uses the lined paper and why use humor Dwayne responds with “Beads, cloth, paper… all of which had been introduced around the same time, and it was at a period when natives of the plains were losing their homeland to new conquerors and their refusal to give up the right to be free caused many to be imprisoned. Many of the earliest ledgers were done during incarceration. Like bead work, it has become a medium for a traditional style. In the Lakota tradition there is the Sacred Clown and in drawing can reflect that humor, I see that as part of the old values of traditional life ways.”
Dwayne currently lives in Rapid City, SD.

http://jwillis.net/artist-statement-dwayne-wilcox/
drawing sheet: 11 3/4 × 18 in. (29.8 × 45.7 cm)
Nude Couple1976R.C. Gorman
R.C. Gorman (1932 - 2005)
drawing Framed: 38 x 32 in. (96.5 x 81.3 cm)
Untitledc. 1930Juan Tafiho Mirabal
Juan Tafiho Mirabal (1903-1981)
painting Framed: 46 1/4 × 97 1/4 × 2 in. (117.5 × 247 × 5.1 cm)
Untitled2003Tony Abeyta
Tony Abeyta Navajo (b. 1965)
Tony Abeyta is considered one of the finest young contemporary painters today. Abeyta explores a variety of mediums including oil, charcoal, and sand. Because he experiments with techniques and images so much, his creativity transcends any label that may be used to identify his work. Abeyta was commissioned to create the signature image of the National Museum of the American Indians groundbreaking opening in Washington, DC. Many of Abeyta's highly original works are depictions of complex Navajo beliefs; they evoke the notion that there is power in everyone and everything. Avid collectors will consider their Abeyta piece to be a gift from a higher power. (Artist's Biography. 2010. Blue Rain Gallery. http://blueraingallery.com/artists/tony_abeyta/)
painting canvas: 71 3/4 x 48 in. (182.3 x 121.9 cm)
Eagle Dancec.1930Julian Martinez
Julian Martinez San Ildefonso Pueblo, NM - United States (1897 - 1943)
painting 16 × 20 in. (40.6 × 50.8 cm)
Night Storm1993Tony Abeyta
Tony Abeyta Navajo (b. 1965)
Tony Abeyta is considered one of the finest young contemporary painters today. Abeyta explores a variety of mediums including oil, charcoal, and sand. Because he experiments with techniques and images so much, his creativity transcends any label that may be used to identify his work. Abeyta was commissioned to create the signature image of the National Museum of the American Indians groundbreaking opening in Washington, DC. Many of Abeyta's highly original works are depictions of complex Navajo beliefs; they evoke the notion that there is power in everyone and everything. Avid collectors will consider their Abeyta piece to be a gift from a higher power. (Artist's Biography. 2010. Blue Rain Gallery. http://blueraingallery.com/artists/tony_abeyta/)
print sheet: 16 3/8 x 11 3/4 in. (41.6 x 29.8 cm)
Sunset1993Tony Abeyta
Tony Abeyta Navajo (b. 1965)
Tony Abeyta is considered one of the finest young contemporary painters today. Abeyta explores a variety of mediums including oil, charcoal, and sand. Because he experiments with techniques and images so much, his creativity transcends any label that may be used to identify his work. Abeyta was commissioned to create the signature image of the National Museum of the American Indians groundbreaking opening in Washington, DC. Many of Abeyta's highly original works are depictions of complex Navajo beliefs; they evoke the notion that there is power in everyone and everything. Avid collectors will consider their Abeyta piece to be a gift from a higher power. (Artist's Biography. 2010. Blue Rain Gallery. http://blueraingallery.com/artists/tony_abeyta/)
print sheet: 16 x 11 1/2 in. (40.6 x 29.2 cm)
Untitled (clown dancer)c. 1960J.D. Roybal
J.D. Roybal San Illdefonso Pueblo (1922 - 1978)
José Disiderio (J.D.) Roybal, whose Tewa name was Oquwa (Rain God), was a well-known painter from San Ildefonso Pueblo. He was born on November 7, 1922 at San Ildefonso, the son of Tonita and Juan Cruz Roybal. He passed away June 28, 1978. He was a nephew of Alfonso Roybal (Awa Tsireh).

He did a bit of painting in the 1930s but was not very productive until the 1950s. He was most productive in the 1960-1970 decade. His most popular subject matter was his rendition of the Tewa Clowns known as Koshare or Koosa. Often he presented them in a jovial manner.

He used water-based paints throughout his career. His excellent detail in small paintings never went unnoticed. In his work there prevails fine color, excellent detail, small and fine outlines, gesturing figures, and a pleasing combination of heavy conventional themes with realistic subjects.

http://www.adobegallery.com/artist/J_D_Roybal_1922_19781791967
print Overall: 6 x 5 1/4 in. (15.2 x 13.3 cm)