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Photography, Prints and Drawings Learn More

Small works on paper often do well in an intimate setting such as the Harwood's gallery for Prints, Drawings and Photographs where the Museum presents changing exhibitions from the permanent collection as well as exhibitions of work on loan.

Drawing and printmaking have had a long and distinguished history in the Taos community. The Museum collection includes important examples by some of the earlier artists including Howard Cook, Joseph Imhof, who brought the first lithography press to Taos, Gene Kloss, Nicolai Fechin, and Walter Ufer.

The post World War II period of the Taos Moderns is represented by the works of Tom Benrimo, Andrew Dasburg, Earl Stroh, and Louis Ribak, while drawings and prints by Larry Calcagno, R.C. Ellis, Ken Price, Joe Waldrum, Vija Celmins, Wes Mills, and Bill Gersh document the work of more recent artists.

TitleDateArtistSorted AscendingClassificationDimensions
Harwood House1918Gustave Baumann (1881-1971)
Gustave Baumann (1881-1971)
Gustave Baumann was born in Magdeburg, Germany, in 1881. Ten years later, along with his family, Baumann relocated to the United States, eventually settling in Chicago. Displaying a natural aptitude for the arts, he worked as a commercial engraver while putting himself through night school at the Art Institute of Chicago - before returning to Germany in 1904 to study wood block printing at the Kunstgewerbeschule ("School of Arts and Crafts") in Munich. Upon his return to the United States, Baumann received international acclaim when one of his color woodcuts won the gold medal at the Pan-Pacific International Exhibition (1915) in San Francisco. Three years later, in 1918, Baumann settled in Santa Fe, quickly emerging as a leading artistic figure of the American Southwest. He is generally credited with the revival of color wood block printing in the 20th century, and was hand-picked as Area Coordinator for the Works Progress Administration's Public Works of Art Project in the 1930's. http://www.gustavebaumann.net/Gustave_Baumann_Biography_Page.htm
drawing Overall: 10 5/8 x 9 13/16 in. (27 x 25 cm)
Frieda Lawrence1947Helen Greene Blumenschein
Helen Greene Blumenschein United States (United States, 1909 - 1989)
Helen Blumenschein was the daughter of nationally famed parents, Ernest and Mary Blumenschein. In 1919 at the age of ten she was brought by her parents from New York to New Mexico, destined with them to pioneer the arts and crafts movement of Taos. Miss Blumenschein stressed that her development as an artist was devoid of parental influence other than the strong family creative atmosphere.

A lifetime deep interest in people, ecology and archaeology is evident in Miss Blumenschein’s dominant work subjects, which depict the mountainous southwest in which she lived most of her life. Her schooling included Taos Schools, The Packer Collegiate Institute in Brooklyn Heights, New York; two years study in Paris and printmaking work at the Art Student League in New York City from 1932-36.

She exhibited prints nationally and abroad from 1936-1945 and has had prints purchased by the Carnegie in 1951, New York CityPublic Library, and the New Jersey Library. Some of her selected one-person shows of portraits include Oklahoma City ArtCenter and the New Mexico Museum of Art.

From her arrival in Taos as a small child, driven from the railroad at Raton on the Colorado border by her father, who barely made it over the steep pass, Blumenschein’s work is vital in scope and history.

http://www.parsonsart.com/home/helen-g-blumenschein

drawing Overall: 20 1/16 x 14 15/16 in. (51 x 38 cm) frame: 20 1/4 x 15 3/8 in. (51.4 x 39.1 cm)
Portrait of Toni Tarleton1973Will-Amelia Sterns Price
Will-Amelia Sterns Price (1907-1995)
Born in Denison, Texas, in 1907, Will-Amelia Sterns Price was a major figure in the development of Beaumont's art scene. This exhibition includes paintings and drawings by Sterns Price focusing on her time in Taos, New Mexico.

https://www.traveltex.com/attractions/will-amelia-sterns-price-mikes-road-to-taos
drawing Overall: 19 15/16 x 16 in. (50.7 x 40.6 cm)
Frank Waters1947Helen Greene Blumenschein
Helen Greene Blumenschein United States (United States, 1909 - 1989)
Helen Blumenschein was the daughter of nationally famed parents, Ernest and Mary Blumenschein. In 1919 at the age of ten she was brought by her parents from New York to New Mexico, destined with them to pioneer the arts and crafts movement of Taos. Miss Blumenschein stressed that her development as an artist was devoid of parental influence other than the strong family creative atmosphere.

A lifetime deep interest in people, ecology and archaeology is evident in Miss Blumenschein’s dominant work subjects, which depict the mountainous southwest in which she lived most of her life. Her schooling included Taos Schools, The Packer Collegiate Institute in Brooklyn Heights, New York; two years study in Paris and printmaking work at the Art Student League in New York City from 1932-36.

She exhibited prints nationally and abroad from 1936-1945 and has had prints purchased by the Carnegie in 1951, New York CityPublic Library, and the New Jersey Library. Some of her selected one-person shows of portraits include Oklahoma City ArtCenter and the New Mexico Museum of Art.

From her arrival in Taos as a small child, driven from the railroad at Raton on the Colorado border by her father, who barely made it over the steep pass, Blumenschein’s work is vital in scope and history.

http://www.parsonsart.com/home/helen-g-blumenschein

drawing 19 7/8 x 14 15/16 in. (50.5 x 38 cm) Framed: 20 1/2 × 15 1/2 × 3/4 in. (52.1 × 39.4 × 1.9 cm)
Andrew Dasburgc.1950Helen Greene Blumenschein
Helen Greene Blumenschein United States (United States, 1909 - 1989)
Helen Blumenschein was the daughter of nationally famed parents, Ernest and Mary Blumenschein. In 1919 at the age of ten she was brought by her parents from New York to New Mexico, destined with them to pioneer the arts and crafts movement of Taos. Miss Blumenschein stressed that her development as an artist was devoid of parental influence other than the strong family creative atmosphere.

A lifetime deep interest in people, ecology and archaeology is evident in Miss Blumenschein’s dominant work subjects, which depict the mountainous southwest in which she lived most of her life. Her schooling included Taos Schools, The Packer Collegiate Institute in Brooklyn Heights, New York; two years study in Paris and printmaking work at the Art Student League in New York City from 1932-36.

She exhibited prints nationally and abroad from 1936-1945 and has had prints purchased by the Carnegie in 1951, New York CityPublic Library, and the New Jersey Library. Some of her selected one-person shows of portraits include Oklahoma City ArtCenter and the New Mexico Museum of Art.

From her arrival in Taos as a small child, driven from the railroad at Raton on the Colorado border by her father, who barely made it over the steep pass, Blumenschein’s work is vital in scope and history.

http://www.parsonsart.com/home/helen-g-blumenschein

drawing Overall: 20 1/16 x 14 15/16 in. (51 x 38 cm) frame: 20 1/4 x 15 3/8 in. (51.4 x 39.1 cm)
Sketch For Neil's Italian Hatc. 1960William Purinton Bomar
William Purinton Bomar United States (United States, 1919 - 1991)
Bomar was born in Fort Worth. He reportedly began painting at age seven after his interest had been sparked by his sitting for a portrait painted by Murray Bewley. Sallie Blythe Mummert taught the youthful Bomar to paint in oils and Joseph G. Bakos instructed him in watercolors in Santa Fe. Bomar attended the Cranbrook (Michigan) Art Academy (1940 - 1941) and studied the following year with John Sloan. Afterward Bomar received criticism from Amedee Ozenfant and instruction from Hans Hofmann. After regular summer stays in New Mexico since his youth, Bomar moved from New York City to Ranchos de Taos in 1972. He died in Clovis, New Mexico.

Bomar tends to dramatize what he sees, turning a grove of tall trees into a quiver of arrows shooting at the blue sky; letting pink houses in Taos all but lose themselves in a pinker sky, or turning a cloudscape over mountains into a giant scenic effect. In short, like Turner, a landscape for him is not a passive spectacle but an emotional force. At its best this is exhilarating work. (New York Times, January 2, 1955)

Everything extraneous is excluded from luminous, semi-abstract landscape paintings whose basic features - rocks, sky sea and cloud forms - appear to belong to a floating world. )New York Times, October 10, 1964)

Source: Texas Painters, Sculptors & Graphic Artists by John and Deborah Powers

drawing Overall: 22 7/16 x 16 3/4 in. (57 x 42.5 cm)
'New Mexico' Band for Cup1978Ken Price
Ken Price (1935 - 2012)
drawing Overall: 9 1/2 x 4 in. (24.1 x 10.2 cm)
Tranquility (No. 1)c. 1964Barbara Harmon
Barbara Harmon (b.1927)
drawing Overall: 13 3/8 x 24 in. (34 x 61 cm)
Taos Valley from Los Cordovas1985Valerie Graves
Valerie Graves (b.1941)
drawing Overall: 16 1/8 x 39 in. (41 x 99 cm)
Points of Entry1984Ginger Mongiello
Ginger Mongiello (b. 1948)
drawing Overall: 22 1/16 x 22 1/16 in. (56 x 56 cm)