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Photography, Prints and Drawings Learn More

Small works on paper often do well in an intimate setting such as the Harwood's gallery for Prints, Drawings and Photographs where the Museum presents changing exhibitions from the permanent collection as well as exhibitions of work on loan.

Drawing and printmaking have had a long and distinguished history in the Taos community. The Museum collection includes important examples by some of the earlier artists including Howard Cook, Joseph Imhof, who brought the first lithography press to Taos, Gene Kloss, Nicolai Fechin, and Walter Ufer.

The post World War II period of the Taos Moderns is represented by the works of Tom Benrimo, Andrew Dasburg, Earl Stroh, and Louis Ribak, while drawings and prints by Larry Calcagno, R.C. Ellis, Ken Price, Joe Waldrum, Vija Celmins, Wes Mills, and Bill Gersh document the work of more recent artists.

Artist: Barbara Latham
Title: Little Girl
Date: 1930
Medium: Oil painting
Dimensions: Overall: 24 x 20 in. (61 x 50.8 cm)
Barbara Latham United States (United States, 1889 - 1989)
“I had lived under the brilliant western sky all summer, but I had never experienced such brilliance, contrasted with such fragrant desert. … I loved Taos from the moment I stepped off the train.” "I’ve been very happy here." "And I’m still having fun with my art."

Known as an accomplished painter, printmaker, and children’s book illustrator, Barbara Latham had idea of her life’s creative trajectory from an early age. At eight years old Barbara Latham won a scholarship to attend a weekend drawing class, and it sparked the young girl’s innate love of art. Shortly after high school, Latham began her more serious artistic studies at the Norwich Academy and Pratt Institute in New York City, as well as summer workshops with Anderw Dasburg at the Students League Summer School in Woodstock, New York. After a corporate stint on Madison Avenue making greeting cards, Latham relocated to the art colony of Taos, New Mexico.

It was in Taos that Latham would meet her eventual husband and fellow artist, Howard Cook. The two were introduced through Victor Higgins, and enjoyed a nurturing partnership spanning more than fifty years. The two traveled extensively through South America, Mexico, and Europe, largely the result of Cook’s Guggenheim Fellowship awards in 1932, and again in 1934. It was from these new, exotic vistas that the couple gathered unfamiliar subject matter and expanded their techniques. Much of what went into Latham’s first children’s book, “Pedro, Nina, and Perrito,” was cultivated during these travels.

In 1938, Latham and her husband purchased a home in Talpa, New Mexico. It was to become the base for a prolific artistic output, featuring everything from playful community scenes to wildlife, and landscapes in her signature stop-action style. Some of Latham’s most notable works include: “View from Our House in Talpa,” “Decoration Day,” “Tourist Town, Taos,” “Getting Ready for the Rabbit Hunt,” and “Rio Grande in the Spring.”

In 1967 the couple lived seasonally in Roswell, New Mexico, after Cook was awarded with the first artist-in-residence at the newly conceived Roswell Museum. By 1976, Howard Cook’s health was failing to the point where the couple relocated once more to a retirement home in Santa Fe. After her husband’s passing in 1980, Latham continued to travel and paint until her own passing in 1989.

https://sites.google.com/site/parsonsartists/home/barbara-latham
1930
Barbara Latham
Artist: Joseph Imhof
Title: Lucinda of Taos
Date: c. 1930
Medium: print lithograph
Dimensions: Overall: 12 5/8 x 11 in. (32 x 28 cm)
Joseph Imhof United States (1871 - 1955)
Joseph Imhoff was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1871. His first exposure to art was at age six when his godfather gifted him with a box of watercolors. Upon graduation, his father refused him further education unless he became a priest. Rejecting his father's wishes, he started teaching himself lithography and was hired by Currier & Ives. He eventually earned enough money from this job to buy a bookstore. In 1991 he eventually quit his job and sold the bookstore to pursue a formal art education in Europe. Traveling and painting for four years in Paris, Brussels, Antwerp and Munich he apprenticed with several artists.

But perhaps the most important experience he had in Europe was to meet Buffalo Bill Cody on board the ship and join him in Antwerp to spend time sketching and painting various members of the "Wild West Show". This experience set in place a style of painting for the rest of his life which focused on ethnographic and anthropological data rather than artistic expression. He documented the religious ceremonies of Pueblo Indians in large, rather simplified oils. He also learned new techniques for lithography which had a long-term influence on his artwork.

When he returned to New York, he rented a studio in Flatbush and began to study the Iroquois Indians in New York and Canada. He spent the next ten years painting and improving his lithography, photography and color printing innovations - which financed his early painting career. He also freelanced for Allen and Ginter, painting his Indian Head Series for insertion on cards in boxes of cigarettes.

In 1897 Joseph married Sarah Ann Elizabeth Russell, and they traveled to Europe several times until 1905 when they visited the Southwest for the first time to record the ceremonies of the Pueblo Indians. Joseph and built a studio in Albuquerque in 1906, and spent much time in the next few years traveling around the region.

In 1929 Joseph and Sarah moved to Taos permanently and built their new home facing the sacred mountain behind the Taos Pueblo. Their neighbor for some twenty years, Mabel Dodge Lujan, was known to refer to him as, "The Grand Old Man of the Pueblos". He would ask native models to live in his home for a time before he painted them. He felt he needed to know the person's soul that the eyes revealed in order to paint an accurate likeness. He collected many Indian artifacts and also had the first lithography press in Taos, which he used to make ethnographic prints and teach his techniques of recording the region's history. His series of paintings called Kivas and Corn which he gifted to the University of New Mexico was his most famous work. The Koshare Indian Museum also houses one of the largest collections of his paintings.

Joseph Imhof died in 1955 leaving an important legacy of the American Southwest. His wife Sarah in later years said of her husband, "...a gentle, dignified man who loathed the publicity and the limelight that other artists seemed to seek; he avoided publicity at all times..."

http://www.josephimhoffpaintings.com/
c. 1930
Joseph Imhof
Artist: Helen Greene Blumenschein
Title: Man, the Slave of Machines
Date: c. 1939
Medium: lithograph
Dimensions: image: 11 1/4 × 9 1/16 in. (28.6 × 23 cm)
Helen Greene Blumenschein United States (United States, 1909 - 1989)
Helen Blumenschein was the daughter of nationally famed parents, Ernest and Mary Blumenschein. In 1919 at the age of ten she was brought by her parents from New York to New Mexico, destined with them to pioneer the arts and crafts movement of Taos. Miss Blumenschein stressed that her development as an artist was devoid of parental influence other than the strong family creative atmosphere.

A lifetime deep interest in people, ecology and archaeology is evident in Miss Blumenschein’s dominant work subjects, which depict the mountainous southwest in which she lived most of her life. Her schooling included Taos Schools, The Packer Collegiate Institute in Brooklyn Heights, New York; two years study in Paris and printmaking work at the Art Student League in New York City from 1932-36.

She exhibited prints nationally and abroad from 1936-1945 and has had prints purchased by the Carnegie in 1951, New York CityPublic Library, and the New Jersey Library. Some of her selected one-person shows of portraits include Oklahoma City ArtCenter and the New Mexico Museum of Art.

From her arrival in Taos as a small child, driven from the railroad at Raton on the Colorado border by her father, who barely made it over the steep pass, Blumenschein’s work is vital in scope and history.

http://www.parsonsart.com/home/helen-g-blumenschein

c. 1939
Helen Greene Blumenschein
Artist: Fritz Scholder
Title: Mystery Horse at Taos
Date: 1978
Medium: print color lithograph on Arches buff paper with deckle edge
Dimensions: Overall: 14 15/16 x 22 3/8 in. (37.9 x 56.9 cm)
Fritz Scholder (1937 - 2005)
1978
Fritz Scholder
Artist: Howard Cook
Title: New Hudson Bridge
Date: 1932
Medium: print lithograph
Dimensions: Overall: 17 1/8 x 12 5/8 in. (43.5 x 32 cm)
Howard Cook United States (United States, 1901 - 1980)
1932
Howard Cook
Artist: Ken Price
Title: 'New Mexico' Band for Cup
Date: 1978
Medium: Print with pencil
Dimensions: Overall: 9 1/2 x 4 in. (24.1 x 10.2 cm)
Ken Price (1935 - 2012)
1978
Ken Price
Artist: Robert C. Ellis
Title: Noche Larga
Date: 1965
Medium: print woodcut
Dimensions: Overall: 13 3/8 x 9 1/16 in. (34 x 23 cm)
Robert C. Ellis United States (1923-1979)
Born in Jackson, Texas, R.C. Ellis first began studying art through The University of New Mexico, Taos Summer Field School in 1942, where he met Andrew Dasburg whom he admired greatly. Ellis would have moved to Taos earlier if it had not been for WWII, and his service through the Coast Guard. After the war he returned to studying art at the New School of Social Research in New York in 1949, where he studied Abraham Rattner and Adja Yunkers (later one of the Albuquerque moderns). He would return to New Mexico the following year to study at the University of New Mexico and eventually obtaining his BFA in 1950. Most importantly to Ellis, between 1947 and 1953, he lived intermittently with the Tarahumara Indians of Mexico’s Sierra Madre whose art he greatly admired. His ties to Mexico, which were as strong as those he felt for the Southwest, became even stronger with his 1957 marriage to Rosamaria Ramirez de Alba, a Mexican citizen. He was the only artist among the Taos Moderns to pursue his career in two countries showing his work on both sides of the border. He returned to Taos in 1961 as a resident of the Wurlitzer Foundation and again briefly in 1964, before finally settling in Taos in 1965.
His paintings from the 1940’s onward moved through Cubist and Abstract Expressionist influenced periods. In the 1950’s his interest in the nature of luminosity led him to try for a kind of stained glass effect. In later works he mosved to a more minimalist – type artwork in both his painting and print making.

His first solo exhibition was at Gump’s Gallery in San Francisco California in 1942 and from there is work was exhibited in Washington D.C., Tucson Arizona, Santa Fe NM, Albuquerque NM, Linsborg KS, Amarillo TX, The Panhandle Museum in Carson County TX, The Ellen Noel Art Museum of the Permain Basin, Odessa TX, and at the Harwood Museum of Art in Taos. He exhibited internationally in several galleried in Mexico, as well as at the Museo Nacional de Arte Moderno in Mexico City in 1964.

Ellis applied what he saw in the landscape, interpreting the lessons garnedred from his observations to create his compositions. Particularly by the time of his late work, he captured in paint, ink and other mediums the paradox of the desert, a surface that at first appears simple, but only because it’s true complexity is so well integrated into a flow of light and form. R.C. Ellis died in Albuquerque New Mexico in 1979.

Artist Biography.2015.203 Fine Art http://www.203fineart.com/Robert_C_Ellis.html
1965
Robert C. Ellis
Artist: Edward S. Curtis
Title: North Pueblo at Taos
Date: 1925
Medium: photogravure
Dimensions: 11 3/8" H x 15 1/2 " W
Edward S. Curtis (Whitewater, WI, 1968-1952)
Dates in Taos: 1925
1925
Edward S. Curtis
Artist: Louis Ribak
Title: Novelist Joseph Foster
Date: 1966
Medium: ink on paper
Dimensions: Overall: 20 x 14 in. (50.8 x 35.6 cm)
Louis Ribak (1903-1979)
1966
Louis Ribak
Artist: Douglas Johnson
Title: Offering to My Dead
Date: 1980
Medium: print / lithograph lithograph
Dimensions: sheet: 30 x 22 1/2 in. (76.2 x 57.1 cm) frame: 33 3/4 x 26 1/8 in. (85.7 x 66.3 cm)
Douglas Johnson United States (United States, b. 1946)
Douglas Johnson's intimate gouache paintings not only reflect the craft of Native American miniaturists but also represent the life and imagery of Northern New Mexico. Born and raised in Portland, Oregon, Johnson is essentially self-taught. His interest in the Southwest began in college when he became a Volunteer in Service to America (VISTA), a government program designed to improve living conditions for the poor in our Country. He was assigned to the Navajo Indian Reservation and quickly fell in love with its rich culture. Although he had been painting and drawing most of his life, it was this experience that inspired him to focus his talents, ultimately resulting in his permanent relocation to New Mexico.

Johnson admits that many of his paintings have their roots in Navajo art. He has, however, been very careful to remain faithful to and nurture the integrity of Native American culture. In fact, he believes that much of his ability comes from his, "first-hand experience living with the Indians and...know[ing] a lot of details of their lives."

Johnson was especially influenced by the work of Harrison Begay of the Dorothy Dunn School. Johnson states, "I started copying his prints. It's why I paint in the flat style, so geometric and linear." Indeed, his small, highly detailed paintings glow with jewel-like colors and hard-edged lines.

In addition to Native American culture, nature has proven to be a significant influence. Johnson learned by, "examining light and shadow, weather, color, flowers, the birds... it's all out there." In fact, as part of an effort to isolate himself and to be closer to Chaco Canyon, the site of many Anasazi ruins, he built a rock house on the side of a cliff near Coyote, New Mexico. The home has no plumbing or electricity. It is Johnson's desire to live as closely to his subject as he possibly can. Much of his own life and environment can be found in his paintings, a testament to his sincerity and to his subject matter.

Johnson has been exhibiting his paintings extensively for years. However, he attributes his success to the experience of painting. "As I paint things over and over, the flowers, the birds, the people, I hope they get deeper and more complex as I see them better. When you paint something, you learn about it, and the more you paint, the more you look, the more you learn."

http://www.matteucci.com/contemporary-artists/douglas-johnson/?view=bio
1980
Douglas Johnson